Dont count the cost of getting caught in the Act

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dataOvertis, vendor of user activity management technology, warns that SMEs cannot afford to lose data now that the Information Commissioner has the power to levy 500,000 fines for breaches of the Data Protection Act. Overtis commentes that the risk is particularly high for smaller organisations, which may not be able to keep security experts on the payroll to control how staff use data, and yet face the same financial penalty as larger enterprises. CEO, Ed Macnair, Macnair points out that the new legislation offers an opportunity for security resellers to provide consultancy on data protection and deliver a real return on investment for their SME customers:
Whether youve got 50 employees or 5,000, the maximum fine for breaching the Data Protection Act will still be 500,000. So the impact is heavier for smaller firms, states Ed Macnair, CEO of Overtis. For larger organisations, the real penalty of a breach is the loss of reputation and customers, but smaller firms could be put out of business by the fines.
Overtis VigilancePro integrates endpoint security, for application and device control, with physical security such as swipe cards, biometrics and CCTV. By creating a centrally managed audit trail of all user interaction with data, Overtis encourages positive behaviour, blocks high risk activity and generates evidence of all attempts to contravene regulations designed to safeguard data, networks and systems. The vendor recently signed a distribution agreement with Softek ( and will be exhibiting VigilancePro 5.0 at InfoSec Europe [Stand D31], Earls Court, 27th 29th April, seeking resellers that are specialised in providing information security and compliance solutions to SMBs.
Data security has always involved a balance between safeguarding information and enabling employees to do their jobs. Security policies need to be enforced using endpoint technology that reminds staff of their responsibilities, then blocks and records any attempted breaches. For a typical firm with 50 employees the potential fine works out at 10,000 per fee earner. Investing in user activity management technology, that guarantees compliance for under 100 a seat, without interrupting normal workflows makes clear business sense.

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